Future upgrade to a 30 x 30

Because I’m new at this and because of size I am leaning toward the midsized machine. If in a year or so I want to increase to the full size by changing out the two rails what’s involved besides the rails and the lead screws?

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I was thinking the same thing. I would assume that we can use normal angle iron and expand the machine in both x and y. Longer lead screws and more supports would be needed. I believe that would be all that’s required.

Just buy the 30x30 and save yourself money, time and head ache!

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If I do i may need to mount it vertically. I have seen the video of it working in that configuration.

That’s the process right there, just the rails and lead screws :+1:

What Paul said. Jonathon Katz-Moses has a great video (Edit: I think it is this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLPg1RCW54M) I watched recently about buying a CNC. He makes a point I wish someone had made to me - buy a slightly larger machine than you think you need, if you can swing it, as you will find it quite frustrating if you outgrow the machine once you get the hang of it. And switching out a machine is often a lot more expensive in time and money than the incremental increase of the larger machine at the start.

The 30x30 is quite versatile but I do find myself pining for something that is just a bit wider. Now that I’ve got a handle on a tiling/indexing workflow that allows me to work on work pieces longer than the work area, I do really wish I could do wider. And even then, while the tiling works fine, it’s a lot of additional work that is saved on a larger machine.

If you’re in to really small hobby projects or small carves and signs, a smaller machine might be ok. If you do anything cabinet/furniture related or want to do larger signs/projects I suspect you’ll want the 30x30 right away. For the money, the 30x30 is incredibly versatile.

-Jeff