Need Help V Bits Using Universal GCode Sender

I’m trying to V carve stars using universal GCode sender when I going to set xyz zero I see endmill dimensions don’t see where to switch it to V bits I have tried putting the v bits dimensions in were it says endmill. I’m using Carbide create to make my stars and when I Simulate they look great. Can you not use UGS to v carve I have tried everything I can think of but I’m new to all of this.

You can use UGS to V carve as it simply sends the Gcode that you create in Carbide Create to the controllers. UGS does not “know” the bit profile or the kind of toolpath that you created.

I’m assuming that when you say that UGS doesn’t let you switch to a V bit, you mean in the touch pad probe module. It’s not a good idea to use a V bit to find X and Y zero using the touch plate. The position will change depending on which part of the bit touches the X and Y axes sides of the plate. Chuck up a straight bit, enter its diameter into the field in the probe module and find X and Y 0. Then, chuck up your V bit and use it on the plate to find Z 0.

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Thanks I tried what you are say and in still didn’t work I think I’m going to try a different software. Not have any trouble using endmills just v bits will let you know if the software works. Thanks for to info.

@ScottL Scott: When you say it didn’t work, what do you mean? What are the results compared to what you are trying to do? Also, when you talk of changing software, do you mean something other than UGS to send the code, or something other than Carbide Create to make the code?

With more info, I’d bet that someone here will be able to help you with this.

I’m trying to get my star to look like the do in this simulation they are coming out with just five straight lines I will try and find both pictures to send you Thanks again

From your picture, I am assuming the the “simulation” is generated by the game software, not CC or UGS, correct?

Someone on here using CC would need to see your set up to be able to help, I would think. I don’t use it. I know that, in Vectric Aspire, stars like that can be done, but it’s quite complex. Here is a Mark Lindsay video showing how he did it in Aspire:

I would bet that your issue is not with UGS.

If I understand the information on the CC website, it cannot create 3D models. It can carve 3D models, but it cannot create them, much like VCarvePro. From your description, you are trying to create 3D models. You could look to MeshCam for that according to the CC website.

Scott, if you are trying to mill from a picture, you need a way to tell the program that creates the gcode that there is depth to your graphic. This generally involves creating a heightmap from your graphic, and your graphic has to show high areas as white, deep areas as black, and in-between elevations as shades of grey. Two program I use occasionally to generate gcode from a heightmap that work well are dmap2gcode and heightmap2stl. Both are freeware. Another one that I use is Novam, but it’s really hard to find for some reason - https://sourceforge.net/projects/novam/files/

Bill

@BillKorn I don’t know about Scott, but these both look very interesting to me. Thanks for posting the links, Bill.

Guys I got it figured out it was the Carbide Create software where had to upgrade it here is a picture of one in did on plywood used a 90^ v bit need to use a 60^ instead.

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@ScottL I thought you were trying to do raised stars. Sorry about that. The video that I sent you is not relevant.
I’m glad that you got it to work.

Scott, glad you figured it out.

It may be obvious, but a 60 deg V will cut the same outline, but it will cut deeper. Depending on the look you’re after, you may want to try a run with both 60 and 90, and even 45 and 30, to make it look right.

Keep chuggin’ along. It’s mistakes that teach us the most.

Have fun. Stay safe.

Bill

Grant, I like finding more than one way to get where I’m headed so I’m always on the lookout for tools and techniques. These were both recommended to me by a guy who does stone carving when I was doing a drawing package for a guy who was restoring an Army tugboat and I needed a way to model the shape of the hull. .Weird how things overlap.

I have a 90 degree v-bit question I’m hoping someone here might be able to answer. Is it feasible to use a 90 degree v-bit to make a 45 degree cut across a 1/2" piece of hardwood flooring? I have a very small piece (short in length) that I need a 45 degree cut across one end. I originally make it quite a bit longer so I was (somewhat) safe to cut on my miter saw, but I would rather just cut the 45 on the CNC if possible. Do you have to use a single pass cut to make that work? It occured to me that having it step down could cause weight results, but I wasn’t sure… haven’t used v-bits before.

Thanks,

-Jeff

Jeff, you probably have the V-bit set up as a chamfering bit in Fusion. You can select the edge you want, choose 2D Chamfer and in the Passes tab set up your chamfer dimensions. The hardest part may be getting the piece of wood aligned accurately enough.

Do you mean that you want to mitre it, or do you want to put a bevel on it? If you want to put a 45° bevel on it, you can use a 90° V bit to cut down through the board, leaving a 45° bevel on each side of the bit.

Your description seems to indicate that you want to mitre it. You can do that with a straight bit, but it’s a lot of set up on the CNC for one mitre cut. I would simply take your small piece, stick it to a sacrificial piece with double sided tape, and cut it on a mitre saw.