Interesting Etsy source for 3D STL CNC Models

I just came across this while looking for some 3D designs for Tiki Masks. I don’t have the files yet, but he has a ton of positive ratings and good reviews. I’m quite optimistic and will update everyone on how they look and how they cut on the Longmill.

Looks like he might take custom commissions too:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/3dmodelsByVadim

-Jeff

3 Likes

Jeff, good find. These look great. <$10 for a detailed STL. Cool. Please share your results.

Bill,

The models are gorgeous but perhaps a bit TOO detailed to be honest. I have only done initial testing with the first one in the set but when I imported it to Fusion 360 it was physically huge. I was looking to scale it to about 6" wide so dropped it considerably. The good news is that if you wanted a large Tiki for your wall, the stock size would suit!

The high degree of detail meant it was difficult to work with inside Fusion. I had to do multiple steps of trying to reduce the number of surfaces using the Mesh tools. All new to me so perhaps there is a better way. I’d always rather have more detail and reduce it than not have enough, so I’m not complaining, just saying there was work to do to make it manageable inside Fusion.

It cut beautifully, until my Z axis came loose very late in one of my final tool paths. :frowning: I’m still struggling with maintaining tensions. Hopefully I get to the bottom of that soon. I used a 1/4" ballnose for roughing and a 1/8th inch single flute for the parallel and other finishing passes and it looked really nice. I was just testing in a scrap piece of 2x6 cedar. I’m planning on replacing a bunch of rotted fence post caps with different Tiki’s to liven up the yard. They will need some hand painting to make them stand out at a distance, but I think these models are exceptional quality and value.

I’m leaning towards re-drawing them in Fusion on top of the STL, as showin Lars various videos on how to do wood carving in Fusion. I think the designs are great, but being able to exagerate the depths of the various pieces and having the shapes be native and a lot less complex from a mesh perspective will make working with them easier. We’ll see how long the first one takes. I reckon if I can get the hang of it, but the time I get to the 9th one I should have enough skill to do most STLs I run across. We’ll see if that’s true or if I lose interest.

I would recommend the models from this guy if there is something you like. At these prices it’s hard not to grab one and dabble. He sends them personally via email once you pay via Etsy and I got mine within a few hours.

If you have a design in mind he is open to making something for you too, depending on complexity and available reference artwork etc.

-Jeff

Jeff, I struggled with working with imported STLs in Fusion on my ancient laptop. Scaling is really slow if Fusion doesn’t crash first. Now I scale the STL in Mesh Mixer and edit it in Meshlab, like if it has a thick base I want to slice off, or borders that I don’t want. Then t’s the right size and shape when I import it into Fusion and the toolpaths can be set up directly from the mesh - No need to do any converting. It’s still not quick, but it’s way faster than dealing with the STL as a mesh.

Thanks, Bill. I’ll check those out. I’m fairly new to working with STLs and Fusion is really the only thing I’ve got at the moment that open them. Your approach makes sense… use something better suited to get it dialed in then just load it.

-Jeff

Yeh, Mesh Mixer and Meshlab are free and are designed for working with STLs - Fusion is not. When you do the setup in Fusion you have to remember to pick the mesh as the model or it won’t work.

There are some here I really like. I’m still in the process of buying a machine but I have been practicing the Vcarve desktop software. I suppose this could work with that program.

I only ever did my initial test cut and due to me not checking all the nuts and bolts before starting the job, the workpiece was runined at about 90% complete. Ugh. That was a few months ago now and I was only trying it in a piece of 2x6 cedar.

The challenge I had was the models are huge and complex and really should be cut from quite large work pieces, but the bits I have have fairly short lengths and I’m not sure once I get a reasonable depth of material (likely 1" or 1.5"+) that my small/short bits will reach deeply enough. Lately I’ve been thinking I should give it another try but first I’ll need to find some stock that is better suited to it… and I still have the dragknife and dust shoe projects in the queue ahead of it (although the plexiglass/acrylic just arrived for the dust shoe and I’ve had the aluminum for a few weeks but not the time… so many fun ways to CNC and not enough time!).

-Jeff